Eritrean dating


16-Apr-2016 16:25

At its height in the 3rd and 4th centuries, Axum’s domains stretched across the Red Sea to include much of modern Yemen.

This kingdom, at times allied with the Byzantine Empire, was the avenue through which Christianity penetrated northeast Africa in the 4th century.

Its ruler, confirmed by a Council of Elders, presided and paid tribute to the Abyssinian king to the south.

The authority of the Bahre Negashes declined in the 18th century, as the region descended into clan warfare that lasted more than 100 years.

The descendants of another, the Hedareb (also known by their language, T’bdawe), inhabit northern Eritrea today.

The Bahre Negash 14th-18th Century) The kingdom of the ‘Sea kingdoms’ or Bahre Negash, arose in highland Eritrea in the 14th century and stretched from the Mereb River to the seacoast, encompassing the core of modern Eritrea.

Among them were extensive settlements circumscribing modern-day Asmara and large sites at Qohaito, Tekhonda’e and Keskse (near Adi keih), at Metera (near senafe) and at Der’a (near Halhal), with more discovered each year.

Greek and Egyptian hunting and trading posts were established on coastal and highland Eritrea in the 3rd century BC and later.

Stone tools from Abdur-at 125,000 years old-are the earliest, best-dated evidence for human occupation of a coastal marine environment.

Soon after this, Menelik and the king of Italy signed the Treaty of Addis Ababa, recognizing Italian claims in Eritrea up to the Mereb River.

A year later, Italy moved Eritrea’s capital to Asmara.

In 615, prior to his victory at Mecca, the prophet Mohammed also sent fifteen of his followers to Adulis in an attempt to counter Byzantine power in the region, making Eritrea one of the earliest non-Arabian sites for contact with Islam.

Axumite power began to decline in the 7th century and collapsed under the strain of internal and external pressures over the next 200 years.

Tools found in the Barka Valley from 8000BC are the first evidence of human settlement here.